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Call for Papers

For the past twenty-two years, The Colloquium for Information Systems Security Education (CISSE) has supported Cyber Security educators, researchers and practitioners in their efforts to improve curricula and foster discussion of current and emerging trends. Please submit your unpublished original paper in the field of Cyber Security /Information Assurance under one of these Tracks, to be considered for presentation at the CISSE 2018 conference and for publication in our bi-annual Journal.

Papers that have been presented at the 2017 Colloquium will be considered for further development and publication in our journal.

Paper submissions are due March 1, 2018

Education Research Paper Track

Papers submitted to the Education Research track describe a novel cyber security education project. Education Research papers should adhere to rigorous standards, describing assumptions, methods of deliver, and results as is typical for generally applicable research studies. These normally focus on educational goals and knowledge units/topics relevant to cyber security education supported with statistical rigor; proper methods of analysis or original techniques in cyber security education such as; evaluation of pedagogical approaches; and studies of the many different populations that are engaged in cyber security education, including (but not limited to) students, instructors, and issues of gender, diversity, and under representation.

Details

For a typical paper in this track, here are some key factors to include (as an author) and to look for (as a reviewer):

  1. Are there one or more clearly stated research questions? Since the rest of the paper will be organized around these, it's often good to put them in the abstract and in the first section of the paper.
  2. Are the questions of interest to the CISSE audience?
  3. Related work in computing education
    • Is the relevant work in cyber security education included? If not, a good review must give references to missing material. Simply saying "The related work section is incomplete" is not enough.
    • Do the authors clearly describe the relationship between the previous work and the current research questions? In what ways does the current project build on the previous work, and how is it different?
  4. Related work in educational theory
    • Is the project based in educational theory?
    • Is the theory described clearly, with appropriate citations?
    • Is the theory's relationship to the current project clearly described?
  5. Is the data gathering sufficiently clearly described that the reader could reproduce it? Some key information to include:
    • About the data: it should be stated why this particular type of data should be considered to be relevant to your research questions
    • About the participants: how many, what was their background (are they instructors, students, alumni, etc.); what if any formal coursework have they had in cyber security; how many were men and how many women; and any other factors that are relevant to the author's project
    • About the person(s) gathering the data: What is their relationship to the participants? For example, if the data were collected from students in a class, was the instructor one of the researchers or not?
    • About the data gathering process: did the project use surveys, interviews, samples of student work, other; If surveys or interviews, exactly what questions were asked.
  6. Is the data analysis sufficiently clearly described that the reader could reproduce it?
    • What methodology was used?
    • Is the methodology described, with an appropriate citation?
    • Is the implementation of the methodology clearly enough described? How many people were involved? What process was used to resolve any disagreements?
  7. Is the analysis methodology something new to cyber security education research that might be a contribution in itself?
  8. Are the results of the analysis clearly summarized?
  9. Are the results thoroughly discussed? Including:
    • Their relationship to the research questions
    • Their relationship to previous work
    • Any threats to validity
    • The implications of the results for future research
    • The implications of the results for teaching

Experience Reports and Tools Paper Track

Experience Reports and Tools papers should sufficiently describe a substantive cyber security education application and its context, and provide lessons learned, including a rich reflection on what worked, what didn’t, and why. This track accepts experience reports, teaching techniques, and pedagogical tools. All papers in this track should provide enough detail that other educators could practically adopt the new innovation.

Details

For a typical paper in this track, here are some key factors to include (as an author) and to look for (as a reviewer):

  1. Are there one or more clearly stated goals in this paper? Since the rest of the paper will be organized around these, it's often good to put them in the abstract and in the first section of the paper.
  2. Is the experience or tool of interest to the CISSE audience?
  3. Related work in cyber security education
    • Is the relevant work in cyber security education included? If not, a good review must give references to missing material. Simply saying "The related work section is incomplete" is not enough.
    • Do the authors clearly describe the relationship between the previous work and the current research questions? In what ways does the current project build on the previous work, and how is it different?
  4. Are the observations and/or findings from the experience or the use of a tool clearly summarized?
  5. Are the findings thoroughly discussed? This includes:
    • Their relationship to previous work
    • The implications of the results for future use
    • The implications of the results for teaching
    • Information on how to adopt or adapt teaching techniques and/or pedagogical tools in other contexts or institutions.

New Curricula, Programs, Degrees & Position Paper Track

New curricula, programs, degrees and position papers. Papers about curricula, programs and degrees should describe the motivating context that led to the new initiative, what it took to put the initiative into place, what the impact has been, and suggestions for others wishing to adopt it. Position papers are meant to engender fruitful academic discussion by presenting a defensible opinion about a specific cybersecurity education topic, substantiated with evidence.

Details

For a typical paper in this track, here are some key factors to include (as an author) and to look for (as a reviewer):

  1. Is the innovation clearly stated? Since the rest of the paper will be organized around this, it’s often good to put it in the abstract and in the first section of the paper.
    • Description of the problem or need being addressed.
  2. Is the curricular innovation or position paper of interest to the CISSE audience?
  3. Related work in computing education
    • What prior solutions to this problem exist?
    • Is the relevant work in computing education included? If not, a good review must give references to missing material. Simply saying “The related work section is incomplete” is not enough?
    • Do the authors clearly describe the relationship between the previous work and the current research questions? In what ways does the current project build on the previous work, and how is it different?
  4. Examination for discussion
    • How is the curricular innovation or position paper addressing this problem or need?
    • How is the curricular innovation or position paper different from previous ideas?
  5. Future Success Indicators
    • How could the curricular innovation or proposed idea be assessed if adopted or implemented?
    • In what context can the curricular innovation or proposed idea be used (large research institutions, community colleges, high schools)?
    • How difficult would the curricular innovation or proposed idea be to adopt it? For example, the human and financial resources needed.

Student Paper Track

A submission to this track must also fit into one of the above tracks: Educational research Track or Experience Reports & Tools Track or New Curricula, Programs, Degrees and Position Track. One talented student will be chosen as the “Erich Spengler Student Paper of the Year” and receive free registration, 3 nights at the hotel and a travel stipend of $500.

Details

  1. Academic writing is writing done by scholars for other scholars. Writing done by scholars for scholars? Doesn't that leave students out? Actually, it doesn't. Now that you are in college you are part of a community of scholars. As a college student, you will be engaged in activities that scholars have been engaged in for centuries: you will read about, think about, argue about, and write about great ideas. Of course, being a scholar requires that you read, think, argue, and write in certain ways. Your education will help you to understand the expectations, conventions, and requirements of scholarship.
  2. Academic writing is devoted to topics and questions that are of interest to the academic community. When you write an academic paper, you must first try to find a topic or a question that is relevant and appropriate - not only to you, but to the academic community of which you are now a part. But how do you know when a topic is relevant and appropriate to this community? First of all, pay attention to what your professor is saying. She will certainly be giving you a context into which you can place your questions and observations. Second, understand that your paper should be of interest to other students and scholars. Remember that academic writing must be more than personal response. You must write something that your readers will find useful. In other words, you will want to write something that helps your reader to better understand your topic, or to see it in a new way.
  3. Academic writing should present the reader with an informed argument. To construct an informed argument, you must first try to sort out what you know about a subject from what you think about a subject. Or, to put it another way, you will want to consider what is known about a subject and then to determine what you think about it. If your paper fails to inform, or if it fails to argue, then it will fail to meet the expectations of the academic reader.

Poster Sessions (Faculty, Researchers & Students Only)

Faculty, Students and Researchers are invited to submit requests for the poster sessions. Poster sessions are non-commercial presentations of topics of interest to the community. The goal of the poster session is to stimulate conversations in the community. Posters present an opportunity to contribute to the conversation without the full process of formal review and the topic and time constraints of formal papers and conference sessions.

Details

  1. Research - A presentation of research information by an individual or research teams at the CISSE conference with an Information Assurance focus. This may include on-going research, smaller research projects, projects not yet ready for full publication, follow-on efforts for previously published material, late breaking developments to share with the community, or research which is best presented graphically rather than in the context of a paper.
  2. Teaching and Education - A presentation on approaches in pedagogy related to Cyber Security. This includes novel approaches to teaching, reinforcing and learning in the area of Cyber Security. Topics may include descriptions of special events, academic focused competitions, and student projects in Cyber Security which demonstrate how they directly contribute to a Cyber Security education. Other items in this area may include novel course designs, or cooperative efforts with areas of academia not normally considered core to information security (e.g. Course module on the design of clothing to increase cyber security by reducing signal dispersion from transmission lines in wearable computers), or approaches for reaching different audiences of information security education.
  3. Thought Stimulation and Challenges - A presentation of a Challenge or of a key concept in Cyber Security and Cyber Security Education designed to stimulate discussion, thought and potential action or research in the area. These may develop into future workshops, birds-of-a-feather, or conference sessions in the future, or they may not, but for now they present interesting challenges, worth thinking about. These posters may provide a basis for research topics to students and scholars. The poster should be designed in as stimulating a manner as possible.
  4. Awards - At least one award will be made in each category and presented at our awards dinner.
  5. Administrative Details - An abstract in "Word" will be submitted for review and all accepted Posters must be accompanied by one registered conference attendee. The work will be reviewed for relevance of content. However, they will not be subject to the same stringent reviews as the paper submissions. The posters will be available throughout the Colloquium. During the designated poster sessions, a member of the poster team should be in attendance and near the poster to answer questions posed by passing colleagues. Team members are encouraged to be available near their posters at other times as well. Contact information for the presenter(s) must be available on the poster.
  6. Submission - Abstracts for posters must be submitted no later than June 1st. Acceptance will be subject to availability of space. Earlier is better.
  7. Format - Presentations will consist of a single poster or display not more than 4 feet wide, 4 feet tall, and 3 feet deep provided by the submitter. Posters must be free standing, easels will be provided.
  8. Emphasis - Poster makers are encouraged to make their posters as graphical as possible including the use of 3-dimensional attachments to their posters. Handouts, brochures or other information sheets may accompany the poster, but they must either be in a container affixed to the poster, or handed out by the presenter.

Questions?

Please email Tamara Shoemaker.


The Colloquium recognizes that the protection of information and infrastructures that are used to create, store, process, and communicate information is vital to business continuity and security. The Colloquium's goal is to work together to define current and emerging requirements for information assurance education and to influence and encourage the development and expansion of information assurance curricula, especially at the graduate and undergraduate levels.


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