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22nd Colloquium

Behavioral, Policy & Management

  • Concluded
  • June 11, 2018
  • 2:00 PM to 2:40 PM
  • Pelican I

Technical approaches alone will not suffice for cyber security insofar as humans play roles in systems as developers, users, operators, or adversaries. Major security breakdowns have occurred because individuals misplace trust, organizations create perverse incentives, or adversaries discover and exploit design flaws. Meeting security needs effectively requires understanding that human context. How does cyber security affect the real-world business or government organization? What investments does it deserve or receive? How does the perceived value of possible practices compare with their demonstrated efficacy? What evidence would help to make these assessments? This presentation argues for the enhanced participation of educators from these disciplines in college and university cyber security programs and is based on the recently published study: Foundational Cybersecurity Research, National Academies of Sciences. National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2017.

NAS Computer Science and Telecommunications Board produced this report.


Seymour Goodman

Seymour Goodman, Georgia Institute of Technology Regents' Professor, Professor of International Affairs and Computing, Adjunct Professor of History. PhD, California Institute of Technology
Research Focus: international technological development, technology diffusion, and related public policy issues; recent work has been concentrated on the study of the global diffusion of the Internet, the security of national and international infrastructures, and the impact of emerging technologies on the conduct and outcomes of large-scale conflicts. Dr. Goodman has worked extensively on these and other topics in technology transfer, export control policies, technological development and absorption in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, cyber security, computer science, discrete mathematics, and mathematical physics. Over the last 45 years, his work and programs have been funded by more than 20 private and public sponsors. Prof. Goodman has served on many academic and government, advisory, study, and editorial committees, and has pursued his interests on all seven continents and about 100 countries. He is Co-Director of the Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy and Director Emeritus of the Sam Nunn Security Program, and Dean's Fellow for Interdisciplinary Research and Education, and Adjunct Professor of History in the Ivan Allen College. Prof. Goodman is a lifetime National Affiliate of the National Research Council of the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. Before coming to Georgia Tech he held various positions at the University of Virginia (applied mathematics, computer science, Soviet and East European studies), Princeton University (mathematics, public and international affairs), the University of Chicago (economics), the University of Arizona (MIS, Middle Eastern studies, Russian and Soviet studies), and most recently at Stanford University where he was director of the Consortium for Research in Information Security and Policy at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and the School of Engineering. As an undergraduate at Columbia University, he studied civil engineering, mathematics, and city planning. He earned his PhD from the California Institute of Technology where he studied problems of mathematical physics.

Last modified on Tuesday, 24 April 2018 19:30

The Colloquium recognizes that the protection of information and infrastructures that are used to create, store, process, and communicate information is vital to business continuity and security. The Colloquium's goal is to work together to define current and emerging requirements for information assurance education and to influence and encourage the development and expansion of information assurance curricula, especially at the graduate and undergraduate levels.


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